The Story of the Original McWhirter Families in Scotland

What We Can Learn from a DNA Study

The Privacy Issue

Various McWh*rter Family Websites

DNA Participant Family Trees -make a match!

Study Results

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CONTACT

 

 

McWhirter DNA Participants

If you are a male whose surname is one of the many variations of the name McWhirter, and you find your ancestor on one of these name lists, chances are we have a DNA record that could be helpful to you. The same thing goes for a female whose maiden name was McWhirter or one of the variant spellings.

Now this isn't enough to prove a relationship. You or one of your male siblings or male cousins who carry the surname would need to be tested as well. Testing is simple, and involves a simple cheek swab that is sent in to the lab. A 12 marker test is no longer considered to be of much value to genealogists. A 37 to 67 marker test is much more telling.

If your YDNA matches another study participant closely, you will want to investigate that member's family tree to see if there are any commonalities or identical ancestors. This is how genealogical DNA research works.

IT IS MANDATORY FOR ALL DNA PARTICIPANTS TO SUBMIT A GEDCOM OR FTM/FTW FILE FOR DISPLAY ON THIS SITE.

I can't understand why some members have not submitted family trees/gedcoms. Without the paper trail, DNA research is worthless. Sure it might tell you that you are related, but it might be back in the drk ages or two generation ago. Only by comparing family tree charts can headway be made in your research.

There are 18 trees here, some of which interlock. I have not attempted to merge them as the info sometimes contains competing parents, but the same descendants. I have run Ancestry.com searches on some of them in an attempt to find additional information. I cannot vouch for the reliability of any of it.

We have 46 members in our DNA study, but only the ones who sent me either a gedcom or a FTM file I was able to convert to html. Those members who sent me lists or chart images, I just don't have the time to input that information by hand.

Here's How to Use This information

Open your web browser to THIS PAGE. It contains the DNA chart information for each member. Keep this page opne, and open another browser window by clicking on internet explorer again.

Because I was unable to find a way to create a single index of all the people in our genealogy charts, you will have to (at least for now) Click on each file below and click on surnames and see if any of that member's ancestors are related to yours. Send me an email with the file name (ie. 14587-I2b1) and I will send your request for information on to that particular project member. Better yet, post a question on the McWhirter Genealogy Worldwide Facebook Group.

I know that this is a lot of work, but it's the only thing I've been able to figure out.

The number is the ID or "kit number" of the project member. What follows the "-" is the Haplogroup that that individual belongs to. The Haplogroup is that string of numbers in the chart in your other browser window. If you find a name/date/place/correct spouse match in the genealogy, then you should have your DNA tested to see how it matches up with the particpant's DNA results.

Mutations happen all the time. One brother out of a family might be born with a mutation of one allele (bit of a gene) and if you carry the same mutation, then you can be pretty sure that you descend from that brother and not the other siblings. More than one difference in alleles makes it harder to say for sure. But people have made advances in their charts by having their DNA tested.

HERE ARE THE FILES:


15497-I2b1 (formerly I1c)
15856-I2b1
15857-I2b1
16135-R1b1b2 (formerly R1b)
16235-R1b1b2
16322-R1b1b2
16334-R1b1b2
16912-I2b1
19102-I2b1
19484-I2b
20220-I2b1
22410-E1b1b1 (formerly E3b)
28827-I2b1
30877-R1b1b2
33784-R1b1
47720-R1b1b2
60521-I2b1
63458-R1b1b2a1b5b

There are over forty participants in the DNA study. But only 18 have submitted paper trails.